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On some other sites in SE networks I have seen questions asking for lists of references, resources or examples of particular phenomenon. To show a few examples

  • Several sites have big list tag.
  • Many questions on book/tutorial/software recommendations for particular topic are of this type, for examples some of the questions here and here.

In most cases I have seen, such questions were marked as community wiki. They are soft question in the sense that they do not have single definitive answer. Some people argue that such questions should be completely eradicated. Some SE sites/communities allow them, but with a warning that they should not be overused.

I personally think that they might be useful on occasion. Typical examples could be questions about book or tutorial for a topic (or website, software, online tool etc.) - everyone might choose their favorite book, but answers to such question might be useful. Many users can learn from them about the books they had not heard about before and what the merits of some particular books are. (The same holds for tutorials, websites, etc.)

TL;DR: Are questions which will end up as big lists and do not admit single definitive answer allowed here?

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First, the big-list tag:

Questions asking for a "big list" of examples, illustrations, etc. Please do not ask too many of these. Please do not use this as the only tag for a question.

A tag with the description "Please do not ask too many of these" usually means the tag shouldn't be created in the first place. I have posted about Grounds of Tag Creation to reasonably scope useful tags...and weed out tags that are not necessary.

Perhaps big-list is reasonably scoped and useful, but how useful? "A tag is a keyword or label that categorizes your question with other, similar questions." big-list is a meta tag - a tag that describes the nature of the answers but does not describe the nature of the questions - and will be a hodgepodge of lists.


Second, soft questions:

Your definition of a soft question is a question that "[does] not have single definitive answer."

Another user's definition of a soft question is a question that is "somewhat outside the core intent of the sites scope."

Already a discrepancy. That said, Sports SE should have its own identity. Yes, among the SE series of sites, but not a carbon copy of Math SE, for example.


Third, recommendations:

Typical examples could be questions about book or tutorial for a topic (or website, software, online tool etc.) - everyone might choose their favorite book, but answers to such question might be useful.

True, but we need to answer in such a way that doesn't (appear to) endorse the resource in question. We need to make sure our content is consistent with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0.

Also, recommendations are not encouraged on any SE site.

However, such questions can be worded to be useful. Again, we need to formulate our questions to be useful to the community. That is, formulate questions that help users with the same question/issue/concern...not only the OP in question. This used to be called "too localized."


Some people argue that such questions should be completely eradicated. Some SE sites/communities allow them, but with a warning that they should not be overused.

My initial reaction is to play it safe and not introduce these tags if they are known to cause debate. Doesn't mean that will not change in the future, however.

Let's focus on the Sports SE community for Sports SE.


Are questions which will end up as big lists and do not admit single definitive answer allowed here?

We do have questions that essentially encourage lists without a single definitive answer: see this - meta, this - meta, and this.

One was flagged for not being a good question. Two have meta questions associated with them. This tells me that these kinds of questions stand out.

I think this shows what we need to better and clearly define.

UPDATE:

After looking at the on-hold reason for too broad:

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.

This SE-endorsed statement would challenge your question.


Are questions about lists of references or online resources on topic?

The help center states:

Some kinds of questions should NOT be asked here:

  • Requests for sources/research

This was agreed to in response to research requests like these.

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