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In YouTube i have seen videos of Mother Cape Buffalo,Topi,Giraffe and Wildebeest protecting their babies from being eaten by predatory animals. These videos inspired me a lot. Plants,Birds,Mammals & many other living organisms live & reproduce their offspring and those reproduced living organisms will also reproduce. That means, propagating their species to the future is an important & continuous function of all these living organisms. Life has evolved in such a way that baby mammals are needed to depend on their mothers till they grow enough to feed & protect themselves. Many mammal species are getting extinct due to human activities and not due to lack of mother's feeding & protection. Mammal species are surviving & propagating to the future means, as babies at their dependent stage they are getting nourished & protected by their mothers. But, if the mammal mothers are sick, if they don't have enough nutrients to raise their babies, if the baby is sick and in the similar cases few mammal mothers sometimes may reject and abandon their own babies. If the babies are dead, if the babies are too sick, in addition to these if the mothers are starving due to lack of food in gestation period and in the similar cases few mammal mothers sometimes may cannibalize their own babies to get energy for their survival. If all the mammal mothers start to abandon or cannibalize their own babies then all the mammal species will become extinct. As propagation of their species to the future is an important function, these extinctions are not at all supposed to happen. Mammal species are surviving & propagating to the future means, as babies at their dependent stage they are getting well fed and protected by their mothers, there is no doubt in that. From this analysis, as mammal species are surviving & propagating to the future, it's clear that in approximately 5500 mammal species, almost all mammal mother species protect their babies from being eaten by predatory animals.

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