-2

Which game is using the term "Butterfly Stroke"?

It asks about one single term used in a sport the OP doesn't (or didn't) know. Hence the question.

Yes, it's a bad question as it's easily googled for. But how can this question be fixed to address the close reason? It's only about a single term and more clarity than that? How's that even possible?

| |
-1

When it was first asked, it was tagged with four different sports, seemingly at random. This makes it unclear what the asker is actually trying to do - do they mean which sports the term was first used in? Regularly used in? Only used in? A specific game in any of those sports? All of those sports?

When it was edited, it was done in a way that makes the question answer itself. Meta considerations are not an appropriate use of tags either. So it's now unclear (as pointed out in a comment) what additional information the question seeks that is not contained in it already.


Finally, the asker says they already found the answer to their question by using Google. Even if it was technically a clear question about a competitive sport, this is not the kind of question what Stack Exchange is for. We are not a human-powered manual search engine or a Google intermediary.

| |
  • The question is very clear. Where is the term being used. Not first, not last, not regular... just where. Only because it's easy to google doesn't make it a close candidate. It's simply down vote and move on. And if you're unhappy with the tags - edit them. – dly Apr 17 at 5:54
  • Where is in neither the title (using "which game") not the body (using "what game"). If it's so clear that it's not even possible to interpret the question without changing it, in a way that significantly affects what answers apply to any correct interpretation, you've only made the point further. – Nij Apr 18 at 3:41
  • 1
    Nonsense. Now you're just nitpicking. Where is x being used? = What/which game is using x? It's pretty common to have questions rephrased, especially those from non-natives. Now that seems to be an unsolvable problem for you? – dly Apr 18 at 7:28

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .