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I provided an answer to the following question: NBA Wingspan-To-Height Ratio

A few days later, an edit was made to the question. The word "wingspan" was replaced with "armspan," and the following edit reason was provided:

People have arms, not wings.

I found two things wrong with this edit:

  • "Wingspan" is widely accepted terminology in the NBA. As noted in my answer, the NBA draft combine uses "wingspan" in their measurements. There was nothing wrong with the terminology as initially used.
  • Ignoring any potential sarcasm, I found this edit to not only be petty, but also granular and pedantic. Had my answer been edited, I would have reedited it to reinclude the initial terminology.

I was pleased to see the question get reedited to reinclude the original terminology used by the OP.

How receptive are we to petty edits like this?

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Assume good faith.

Until proven otherwise, my view is that this was a well-meaning edit intended to improve the question. It so happens that "wingspan" is the normal terminology within basketball, but it's certainly not common in everyday speech - for example, the Wikipedia disambiguation page for Wingspan doesn't include the meaning for a person, and neither does (say) Merriam-Webster.

  • This is very fair. My concern was having to reedit my answer only for it to be reedited back using the updated term, which would be unnecessary, in my eyes. – user16112 Feb 11 at 13:14
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    As always, communicate. If you're reverting somebody's edit, add a comment or post something in chat to explain why. – Philip Kendall Feb 11 at 21:48
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    @user16112 I will just add to Philip Kendall's comment that a good place where to explain the reason for editing is the edit summary - it is shown when [displaying the revision history[(sports.stackexchange.com/posts/20965/revisions). – Martin Feb 18 at 8:32
  • @Martin For historical context, that's where I read the reason for the edits. – user16112 Feb 21 at 17:57

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